Conjunction

Pronunciation: /kənˈdʒʌŋk ʃən/ Explain

A conjunction is a mathematical operator that returns an output of true if and only if all of its operands are true.[1]

A conjunction can be written as:

a AND b
a ^ bin logic
a && bin some computer languages
a · bin electronics

aba AND b
truetruetrue
truefalsefalse
falsetruefalse
falsefalsefalse
Figure 1 - Truth table of a AND b.

Venn diagram of a AND b
Figure 2 - Venn diagram of a ^ b.

References

  1. Alan Hausman, Howard Kahane, Paul Tidman. Logic and Philosophy: A Modern Introduction. 11th edition. pp 21-24. Wadsworth Publishing. March 12 2009. Last Accessed 8/6/2018. Buy the book
  2. Paul Herrick. The Many Worlds of Logic. 2nd edition. pp 31-35. Oxford University Press, USA. May 28, 1999. Last Accessed 8/6/2018. Buy the book

More Information

  • McAdams, David E.. Biconditional. allmathwords.org. All Math Words Encyclopedia. Life is a Story Problem LLC. 6/27/2018. http://www.allmathwords.org/en/b/biconditional.html.

Cite this article as:

McAdams, David E. Conjunction. 6/29/2018. All Math Words Encyclopedia. Life is a Story Problem LLC. http://www.allmathwords.org/en/c/conjunction.html.

Image Credits

Revision History

6/25/2018: Removed broken links, updated license, implemented new markup, updated GeoGebra apps. (McAdams, David E.)
12/21/2009: Added "References". (McAdams, David E.)
7/11/2008: Added 'Disjunction' to 'More Information'. (McAdams, David E.)
7/16/2007: Initial version. (McAdams, David E.)

All Math Words Encyclopedia is a service of Life is a Story Problem LLC.
Copyright © 2018 Life is a Story Problem LLC. All rights reserved.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License