Complete

Pronunciation: /kəmˈplit/ ?

An axiomatic system is considered to be complete if all the theorems that are part of the system can be proved true.[1] Note that all the theories do not have to actually be proved true, only be capable of being proved true.

References

  1. complete. http://wordnet.princeton.edu/. WordNet. Princeton University. (Accessed: 2011-01-08). http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=complete&sub=Search+WordNet&o2=&o0=1&o7=&o5=&o1=1&o6=&o4=&o3=&h=.
  2. Simon Blackburn. completeness, pg 69. The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, 2nd edition. Oxford University Press, October 2, 2008.
  3. Peil, Timothy. Introduction to Axiomatic Systems. (Accessed: 2010-01-16). http://www.mnstate.edu/peil/geometry/C1AxiomSystem/AxiomaticSystems.htm.

More Information

  • McAdams, David. Axiom. allmathwords.org. All Math Words Encyclopedia. Life is a Story Problem LLC. 2009-03-12. http://www.allmathwords.org/article.aspx?lang=en&id=Axiom.

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Complete. 2010-01-04. All Math Words Encyclopedia. Life is a Story Problem LLC. http://www.allmathwords.org/en/c/complete.html.

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2010-01-04: Added "References" (McAdams, David.)
2008-04-25: Initial version (McAdams, David.)

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